Divine Mother ~ A Mothers Blessing

Divine Mother ~ A Mothers Blessing, Part III of the Divine Feminine Sacred Goddess Series.

Creating these videos are a time consuming labor of love, often taking months to gather and sort through images, including only those which truly express the particular energy I want to have resonate from the piece in alignment with the Sacred. The music is Mothers Blessing from Liberation’s Door by Snatam Kaur. It is very beautiful and invokes a heart essence of love and more love.

Spring ~ Oh Spring

It is spring in Central Oregon. The sunning is shining down through a soft blue sky. Laundry hangs fresh on the line, lilacs and bleeding hearts embellish a glass vase upon the table, their perfuming floating. The backdoor sits open, the patio chairs send out an invitation to stop and revel under the warming sun. Birds chirp, tweet and flutter in the trees; from the birdbath. Bees are buzzing and busy flitting and finding.

Spring springs and the delights are in the being, in the unhurried moments of May-time laughter as color pushes from the earth. Before the headiness of summer and the full bloom sways us, spring enters in her quiet un-contrived way. And it is all the better in the waiting her return. Oh ~  I live for just these days as one unfolds after another as petals in the bud.

Spring invokes poetry – The poetry of Spring in all her quiet glory; her accolades are heralded far and wide. For who can herald rebirth without spring and where would we find the first notes to sing her praise.

In time of daffodils (who know
the goal of living is to grow)
forgetting why, remember how
in time of lilacs who proclaim
the aim of waking is to dream,
remember so (forgetting seem)
in time of roses (who amaze
our now and here with paradise)
forgetting if, remember yes
in time of all sweet things beyond
whatever mind may comprehend,
remember seek (forgetting find)
and in a mystery to be
(when time from time shall set us free)
forgetting me, remember me
e.e. cummings
.

~ To My Old Master ~

In August of 1865, a Colonel P.H. Anderson of Big Spring, Tennessee, wrote to his former slave, Jourdan Anderson, and requested that he come back to work on his farm. Jourdan — who, since being emancipated, had moved to Ohio, found paid work, and was now supporting his family — responded spectacularly by way of the letter seen below (a letter which, according to newspapers at the time, he dictated).   Via: Letters of Note

(Source: The Freedmen’s Book; Image: A group of escaped slaves in Virginia in 1862, courtesy of the Library of Congress.)

Dayton, Ohio,

August 7, 1865

To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, “Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams’s Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant,

Jourdon Anderson.

 

What’s In the New New

I keep an eye and ear toward new. Now I love old, vintage, tried and true and nod respectfully to that which cannot be improved, yet there is a plethora of new to be discovered (possibly on their way to becoming tried and true), just sitting around the corner to bring joyful delights into the everyday. Whether it be a new sound, artistic expression, authored beauty; fresh interpretations of the tried and true or the dawning of a whole new way to relish in the abundance of creativity. It is an adventure for me which brings pure satisfaction.

Here are a few new finds which have made their way to top of my list. Two musicians, two authors and two artists. Enjoy, pass them along and be adventurous.

Musicians ~ Desert Blues: Toumast & Tinariwen

Toumast ~ Musicians from the Niger Republic, of the Tuareg people. I love their sound. Very beautiful and soulful. They have been around for awhile, (Ishumar was recorded in 2007) and recently made their way to my ears and brought a little dance of joy ~

 

Tinariwen ~ is a band of Tuareg musicians from the Sahara Desert of Northern Mali. Around since 1979 they came into a wider following around 2001. This song is from the album Imidiwan.


Authors: Teddy Wayne & Erin Morgenstern

Teddy Wayne is a fresh modern voice in contemporary literature. His excellent first novel, Kapitoil, is sharp and clean, earning Wayne a prestigious fellowship from The National Endowment of The Arts and the 2011 Whitings Writers Award. Accolades for Kapitoil are far and wide. This book was chosen by our local Novel Idea for 2011

Erin Morgenstern recently authored The Night Circus. A beautiful novel set in the arena of a magical circus. The story is intricate and multilayered in design and scope. I found the reading rich and poetic. Morgenstern imparts lyrical descriptions of black and white scenery which is sated with colorful imaginings and details. Treat yourself.

Artist: Hannah Larkin & Michelle Cross

Hannah Larkin (my niece) is a delightful woman with an adventurous spirit. She creates original artwork for note cards, invitations, wedding announcements, stationary, etc. Her designs are beautifully drawn with attention to detail. Elegant to simple her unique eye and skill are a treat to behold. Hannah does custom designs as well and is currently available through Etsy. See more of Hannah and her work at Michelle Cross Photography

Michelle Cross is photographer with an intuitive romantic eye. Michelle’s perspective is youthful, fun and elegant. Whether capturing portraits, weddings, scenery or still life her eye is consistent in creating a contemporary image perfectly in the moment with a timeless quality; lovely.

A Little Here, A Little There, A Little Everywhere

I will be away for the next 10 days to 2 weeks. In the meantime I am posting a few “love” notes. . .

~ Be happy, be well, be mindful, be kind, be the One you have been waiting for ~ “work out your own salvation with awe and trembling”, the journey of life . . . and know that God is GOOD. Share goodness and drop all the other b.s., look to the heart and live the truth of your existence, know who you SERVE, be brave, bold and beautiful, and don’t forget to pray and dance, my favorite Supersize!! life combo.

Start with a little POV (point of view via karmatube)

Boonaa Mohammed “Kill Them With Love”

 

A little music for the love of voice.

Edith Piaf ~ C’est Un Monsieur Très Distingu

 

Fear A Bhata ~ Niamh Parsons

 

Wise words from my wise brother Tim . . .”Faith is not built so much on what God has done in the lives of others.  Faith is built on remembering what God has done in each of our lives personally.  Faith is built on remembering…”

Remember creativity is limitless . . .